I’ve never seen my book on the shelves of an airport bookseller…until today at The Washington-Dulles Airport! Such a surreal moment - plus mine shares space with the incomparable Rosie Perez.

I’ve never seen my book on the shelves of an airport bookseller…until today at The Washington-Dulles Airport! Such a surreal moment - plus mine shares space with the incomparable Rosie Perez.

Janet Mock is not playing the game of respectability politics. She could, if she wanted, be a kind of trans woman Bill Cosby, at pains to make an example of her normalcy, eager to give an image makeover to trans people at large. “I have been held up consistently as a token,” she says in her new memoir Redefining Realness, “as the ‘right’ kind of trans woman (educated, able-bodied, attractive, articulate, heteronormative).” But having grown up low-income, multiracial, and trans, Mock knows too much about being the wrong kind of woman to glory in exceptionalism. Since the 2011 profile in Marie Claire in which she announced herself as a trans woman, she’s started the #GirlsLikeUs Twitter campaign and become a spokesperson and activist for trans issues. The profile more or less maintained the rhetoric of respectability, leading with her “supportive man” and “enviable career” as editor of People.com. But now Mock is telling her own story, and she does not omit the dark, the delicate, and the potentially disreputable.
Walking In My Truth, Dealing With My Depression

2brwngrls:

I just spent two hours reading Janet Mock’s old blog, MusingsOnLove, mostly from start to finish. It was was a sort of beautiful teaser of her upcoming book Redefining Realness, which comes out in a few days. The blog chronicles her day to day life from 2009 to 2010 (before the release of her seminal Marie Claire article), where she talks not only about her romances but also her creative life as a writer. Janet is such an inspiration to me because in many ways her life and career represent so much that I want for myself: to be (or rather feel) beautiful, to be a writer (and make money doing it!!), to be in love, and to stand for and by a cause that I really believe in, affecting change in the world that goes beyond just stroking my own ego.

And reading Janet’s journey at a time when she was just 26 years old (an age I’m not far from) was so encouraging, because in reading each post it was amazing to read her talking about her dreams and goals, knowing that in just four years she would actually be exceeding those goals, walking in her truth as a twoc/activist, and as a result inspiring so many trans women and women of color. It made me hopeful and soothed my soul to read her words, because I really needed them. I needed that example of the possibilities that are open to us when we choose the life we want for ourselves rather than accepting what we think our lives should be, and ultimately decided to be happy not in the future but in the now.

Because I’ve been depressed since I was eleven years old. Meaning to say, as unbelievable as it sounds (even to myself), I can’t remember a time other than early childhood (which itself is murky at best) when I was never not in a constant state of debilitating anxiety, self-loathing, and despair. As a teenager, before I was formally diagnosed, I would revel in my sadness. I mistook it for teenage angst. I mistook it for something almost romantic, being perpetually sad, perpetually unable to walk the halls of my high school without the feeling as if I would dissolve any minute from panic… 

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Zeba, I am in awe of your vulnerability + power. 

Thank you for sharing your truth with us. 

Write on, my dear sister.

POC-CREATORS: Trans women writers--apply to these grants and residencies!

topsidepress:

One of the ways that authors and their books get into circulation in libraries, classrooms, on the desks of book critics at the New York Times, and other useful places, is via the complex, often shrouded, world of professional arts. Part of the reason you go to a residency at…

Signal boost!

I don’t write with my face, I write with my brain.
Perhaps everybody has a garden of Eden, I don’t know; but they have scarcely seen their garden before they see the flaming sword. Then, perhaps, life only offers the choice of remembering the garden or forgetting it. Either, or: it takes strength to remember, it takes another kind of strength to forget, it takes a hero to do both. People who remember court madness through pain, the pain of the perpetually recurring death of their innocence; people who forget court another kind of madness, the madness of the denial of pain and the hatred of innocence; and the world is mostly divided between madmen who remember and madmen who forget. Heroes are rare.

Today Publisher’s Weekly announced that my memoir Fish Food will be published by Simon & Schuster’s Atria Books in early 2014.

I’m so elated that I’m doing Rihanna’s “vagina” dance from “Birthday Cake” on SNL.

Desire is not enough. You need to have a need, and if you have that need then chances are you’re already writing. That’s why I’m always suspicious when people come up to me and say, ‘Mr. Pitts I’m an aspiring writer.’ There is no such thing as aspiring. You’re either a writer or you are not.
Here my image lies, on the Contributors page of Ladygunn magazine’s Fall issue, in which I write about my first crush who helped me find the love of my life.
You can buy a digital or hardcopy of Ladygunn's latest issue online.

Here my image lies, on the Contributors page of Ladygunn magazine’s Fall issue, in which I write about my first crush who helped me find the love of my life.

You can buy a digital or hardcopy of Ladygunn's latest issue online.

You have to let people see what you wrote. It will never be perfect, but perfect is overrated.