bitteroreo:

walkingthenarrowway:

oldfilmsflicker:

Hollywood’s Problem With Women of Color Is Even Worse Than You Realize - PolicyMic

and notice how they’re almost all cartoons cause it’s so hard for white amerikka to humanize real WOC.

But they don’t hear us doe…

Why we must keep creating our own mirrors.

Action Required: Ask Susan Epstein to Respect Eyricka Morgan’s Identity + Life

Today, I sent the following email to Susan Epstein of the The Star-Ledger about her report of the murder of Eyricka Morgan, a young trans woman of color who was murdered in her boarding home.

I’m heartbroken about the death of someone I knew, and shocked by the fact that Ms. Epstein chooses to carelessly erase Eyricka’s identity as a woman and her life as well, telling our community that she needs confirmation or proof that Eyricka was a trans woman.

Please email (sepstein@starledger.com), tweet  or call the reporter at (732) 249-5670 about misgendering Eyricka Morgan in . The point of this action is not to vilify Ms. Epstein, it’s to set the record straight on our lives.

Feel free to use my email as a template:

Hi Susan,

I will go on record, as an activist who knew the victim, Eyricka Morgan. She was a transgender woman of color and an advocate in the community. She went by she and her, and her identity should be respected even after her passing, despite what records may or may not say.
As a journalist who worked for mainstream media (I previously worked for People.com), I know that reflecting the truth of people’s lives is vital. The misgendering and erasure of Ms. Morgan’s identity does not only hurt her life and legacy, it also hurts an entire community of marginalized and often stigmatized people who are grappling with discrimination on many levels in our country.
http://www.nj.com/middlesex/index.ssf/2013/09/new_brunswick_man_charged_with_stabbing_man_to_death_in_city_boarding_house.html

Please fix this careless error and stop requiring that our lives need proof. We are who we say we are.

Thanks,

Janet Mock

Transgender People of Color: Still Fighting for Equal Rights

I spoke with The Root about the needs of trans people, specifically those of color. When I was approached on Twitter by journalist/writer E. Wyckoff Williams, the interview was framed as a piece highlighting the needs of trans people of color. I agreed to answering a few questions via email under the impression that a quote or two would be used to contextualize Williams’ commentary. 

For transparency sake, I must express that I was irked this morning to see that the piece evolved into one about Janet Mock speaking about trans people of color issues, as communicated via my image and the publishing of our entire email exchange. [I’ve expressed my frustration to the writer about the framework of the piece.]

Admittedly, I’m wary about these types of frameworks that center on an individual rather than the wider work, struggles and dire needs of a movement. Let’s be clear, I am just one of many trans folk of color who have done and are doing this necessary work.

Despite my frustrations about the editorial framing of the piece, I understand why the editors chose to personalize such a broad issue. It is a solid piece, and I’m glad I was able to contribute and speak broadly about some of the needs of our vast community. I hope those who may need a face to attract them to read such a story actually look past the personality, avoid commenting on my looks and body, get enlightened and begin speaking out on our need to care after all our siblings of color.

Read it here.

I was the sole woman, trans person, and individual of color during this panel discussion on MSNBC/Google+ about DOMA, PROP 8 and marriage equality. I pointed this out on air because it needs to be said. 

Yes, Chris Hayes, Zach Wahls, Carter Gibson and Eddie Outlaw were wonderful. Yet the lack of diversity in media is very much obvious, even in these discussions about equality and community (it was called, “Changing Your Community”).

We need to ensure that the voices are representative of our communities.

Today, I returned to the Melissa Harris Perry Show, where (guess what???) I got to discuss…TV + Scandal + media representations of black women. I got the chance to speak about something other than just being trans in mainstream media. 

It’s an exhibition in the fact that trans people do have other interests than just being trans or having “transitioned.” It was a pleasure to return to my giddy pop culture editor roots (with a touch of depth, right?!) and do it on such a powerful platform with one of my sheroes, Melissa Harris Perry.

On the New York Times’ Dehumanizing Portraits of Trans Women

With my recent media critiques of the New York Times, I’ll probably never reach my goal of getting Michiko to read my memoir. But our living history is so much bigger than the personal dreams I have for myself. I urge us to mine the anger and frustration and disappointment into creativity and expression. Don’t let the New York Times (as evidence in their portraits of Lorena Escalera and the women of Christopher Street) stand as the record of our lives: Trans women are so much more than the less-than-human portraits they continue paint of us.

I write more here. 

babyshibe asked: Browsing the 'trans' tag on tumblr, I came across a link to your story - and then was amazed to find your blog! Just thought I'd add that it's LOVELY and encouraging to read a story that turns out so well :) Positive stories about trans people's experiences seem to be sadly few and far between, and it gives me hope for the future that you've had an experience like that :)

I’m finally answering these questions (because it’s only been a year right?)…

Thank you first and foremost. I point my finger at media gatekeepers (I’m apart of the media, so I take fault as well) who seem to only be interested in tantalizing struggles rather than the sometime mundane existence of happiness that does exist in our world for cis and trans folks. I’m glad that I can elevate, through my personal story, both the struggle and the joy of humanity. Balance is key.

On Being ‘Trapped’ By My Body - And Reclaiming It

It took Dateline NBC's Hoda Kotb approximately 13 minutes into her segment - on medical treatments for trans kids - to ask 11-year-old trans girl Josie Romero of Tucson, Arizona: “Do you feel trapped in the wrong body?” 

Whenever this question is posed, I find it to be more of a leading statement rather than a true inquiry or invitation for a trans subject to speak about their life experience or outlook on their relationship with their bodies.

Whenever it’s posed it never sits well with me. And here’s why:

http://janetmock.com/2012/07/09/josie-romero-dateline-transgender-trapped-body/

On Sunday, March 25th, I’ll be joining MAD Free with Michaela angela Davis for a Modern Women’s History Month conversation in Harlem at 1pm. Please join us - it’s FREE! - as we discuss image, acceptance, self-definition and a bit of hair too.
Here’s the event’s details:
*MAD Free* with *Janet Mock*
Is proudly a part of *Sundae Sermon * 
Sunday, March 25, 2012  @ 1pm 
El Mueso del Barrio 
1230 5th Ave. @ 105th St. 
Free to the Public.

On Sunday, March 25th, I’ll be joining MAD Free with Michaela angela Davis for a Modern Women’s History Month conversation in Harlem at 1pm. Please join us - it’s FREE! - as we discuss image, acceptance, self-definition and a bit of hair too.

Here’s the event’s details:

*MAD Free* with *Janet Mock*

Is proudly a part of *Sundae Sermon * 

Sunday, March 25, 2012  @ 1pm 

El Mueso del Barrio 

1230 5th Ave. @ 105th St. 

Free to the Public.