Three years ago, I first told my story in Marie Claire. Today, I am proud to announce that I am joining the magazine’s editorial team as a Contributing Editor. In my role, I will write for the print and online versions of the magazine, act as a brand ambassador and contribute insight and ideas about culture and beauty, politics and pop culture.

Three years ago, I first told my story in Marie Claire. Today, I am proud to announce that I am joining the magazine’s editorial team as a Contributing Editor. In my role, I will write for the print and online versions of the magazine, act as a brand ambassador and contribute insight and ideas about culture and beauty, politics and pop culture.

Author Janet Mock Breaks Through the Isolation for Trans Women of Color

I appreciate Jenn M. Jackson for doing this interview after reading my book and wanting it to be published in a black space. I’m even more grateful the lessons its showed her regarding trolling of trans women of color within communities of color, as she’s shared on Twitter

Sometimes we must occupy spaces of communities even if they don’t want us to be there. It’s vital to transforming spaces. It’s what I learned from Barbara Smith (Happy 40th anniversary Combahee River Collective!), from Audre Lorde…sometimes the trolls are your own people, they come from all sides, and as Zora Neale Hurston said: 

“Sometimes, I feel discriminated against, but it does not make me angry. It merely astonishes me. How can any deny themselves the pleasure of my company? It’s beyond me.” 

zerlinamaxwell:

Me and @janetmock at #wamnyc! (at Barnard College)

Just two black girls in media sharing space, hair, beyonce love and stripes. <3 Zerlina Maxwell!

zerlinamaxwell:

Me and @janetmock at #wamnyc! (at Barnard College)

Just two black girls in media sharing space, hair, beyonce love and stripes. <3 Zerlina Maxwell!

womanistgrrrlcollective:

[x]
Date: June 7, 2014Start Time: 09:00 amEnd Time: 5:00 pmLocation: Barnard Hall at Barnard CollegeAddress: W 117th St &amp; BroadwayWhere: New York CityRSVP: Click Here
Are you feminist media maker or activist? Love creating, consuming, and critiquing media that deals with race, gender, and class? Want to get more tools, strategies, and ideas to do your work better and meet others doing awesome work? Join us for the fifth annual WAM!NYC Feminist Media Conference on June 7 at Barnard College! Click here to register now!
This year’s keynote event will be a Q&amp;A will be the incredible Janet Mock, transgender rights activist and author of Redefining Realness, moderated by Zerlina Maxwell, political analyst and writer.
Panels this year will include discussions and workshops on: effective social media, long-form journalism, book publishing, art and activism, and navigating the editor/writer relationship, among others!
This year’s conference will be bigger than ever before, but still, seats are limited. We expect this event to sell out quickly. We want everyone in the WAM!NYC community to be able to secure a seat, so we strongly encourage you to buy your ticket now! 
Please email wamnyc-board@googlegroups.com if you would like to volunteer or for a reduced price.
Thank you to our co-sponsor Barnard College!

Excited to be apart of this powerful day!

womanistgrrrlcollective:

[x]
Date: June 7, 2014
Start Time: 09:00 am
End Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Barnard Hall at Barnard College
Address: W 117th St & Broadway
Where: New York City
RSVP: Click Here

Are you feminist media maker or activist? Love creating, consuming, and critiquing media that deals with race, gender, and class? Want to get more tools, strategies, and ideas to do your work better and meet others doing awesome work? Join us for the fifth annual WAM!NYC Feminist Media Conference on June 7 at Barnard College! Click here to register now!

This year’s keynote event will be a Q&A will be the incredible Janet Mock, transgender rights activist and author of Redefining Realness, moderated by Zerlina Maxwell, political analyst and writer.

Panels this year will include discussions and workshops on: effective social media, long-form journalism, book publishing, art and activism, and navigating the editor/writer relationship, among others!

This year’s conference will be bigger than ever before, but still, seats are limited. We expect this event to sell out quickly. We want everyone in the WAM!NYC community to be able to secure a seat, so we strongly encourage you to buy your ticket now! 

Please email wamnyc-board@googlegroups.com if you would like to volunteer or for a reduced price.

Thank you to our co-sponsor Barnard College!

Excited to be apart of this powerful day!

Want to know why I asked Alicia Menendez about her vagina + other inane, invasive questions? Read my new essay about our demonstration, where I turned the tables on her, asking her all the questions every trans person is tired of answering. 

Want to know why I asked Alicia Menendez about her vagina + other inane, invasive questions? Read my new essay about our demonstration, where I turned the tables on her, asking her all the questions every trans person is tired of answering. 

bitteroreo:

walkingthenarrowway:

oldfilmsflicker:

Hollywood’s Problem With Women of Color Is Even Worse Than You Realize - PolicyMic

and notice how they’re almost all cartoons cause it’s so hard for white amerikka to humanize real WOC.

But they don’t hear us doe…

Why we must keep creating our own mirrors.

Action Required: Ask Susan Epstein to Respect Eyricka Morgan’s Identity + Life

Today, I sent the following email to Susan Epstein of the The Star-Ledger about her report of the murder of Eyricka Morgan, a young trans woman of color who was murdered in her boarding home.

I’m heartbroken about the death of someone I knew, and shocked by the fact that Ms. Epstein chooses to carelessly erase Eyricka’s identity as a woman and her life as well, telling our community that she needs confirmation or proof that Eyricka was a trans woman.

Please email (sepstein@starledger.com), tweet  or call the reporter at (732) 249-5670 about misgendering Eyricka Morgan in . The point of this action is not to vilify Ms. Epstein, it’s to set the record straight on our lives.

Feel free to use my email as a template:

Hi Susan,

I will go on record, as an activist who knew the victim, Eyricka Morgan. She was a transgender woman of color and an advocate in the community. She went by she and her, and her identity should be respected even after her passing, despite what records may or may not say.
As a journalist who worked for mainstream media (I previously worked for People.com), I know that reflecting the truth of people’s lives is vital. The misgendering and erasure of Ms. Morgan’s identity does not only hurt her life and legacy, it also hurts an entire community of marginalized and often stigmatized people who are grappling with discrimination on many levels in our country.
http://www.nj.com/middlesex/index.ssf/2013/09/new_brunswick_man_charged_with_stabbing_man_to_death_in_city_boarding_house.html

Please fix this careless error and stop requiring that our lives need proof. We are who we say we are.

Thanks,

Janet Mock

Transgender People of Color: Still Fighting for Equal Rights

I spoke with The Root about the needs of trans people, specifically those of color. When I was approached on Twitter by journalist/writer E. Wyckoff Williams, the interview was framed as a piece highlighting the needs of trans people of color. I agreed to answering a few questions via email under the impression that a quote or two would be used to contextualize Williams’ commentary. 

For transparency sake, I must express that I was irked this morning to see that the piece evolved into one about Janet Mock speaking about trans people of color issues, as communicated via my image and the publishing of our entire email exchange. [I’ve expressed my frustration to the writer about the framework of the piece.]

Admittedly, I’m wary about these types of frameworks that center on an individual rather than the wider work, struggles and dire needs of a movement. Let’s be clear, I am just one of many trans folk of color who have done and are doing this necessary work.

Despite my frustrations about the editorial framing of the piece, I understand why the editors chose to personalize such a broad issue. It is a solid piece, and I’m glad I was able to contribute and speak broadly about some of the needs of our vast community. I hope those who may need a face to attract them to read such a story actually look past the personality, avoid commenting on my looks and body, get enlightened and begin speaking out on our need to care after all our siblings of color.

Read it here.

I was the sole woman, trans person, and individual of color during this panel discussion on MSNBC/Google+ about DOMA, PROP 8 and marriage equality. I pointed this out on air because it needs to be said. 

Yes, Chris Hayes, Zach Wahls, Carter Gibson and Eddie Outlaw were wonderful. Yet the lack of diversity in media is very much obvious, even in these discussions about equality and community (it was called, “Changing Your Community”).

We need to ensure that the voices are representative of our communities.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Today, I returned to the Melissa Harris Perry Show, where (guess what???) I got to discuss…TV + Scandal + media representations of black women. I got the chance to speak about something other than just being trans in mainstream media. 

It’s an exhibition in the fact that trans people do have other interests than just being trans or having “transitioned.” It was a pleasure to return to my giddy pop culture editor roots (with a touch of depth, right?!) and do it on such a powerful platform with one of my sheroes, Melissa Harris Perry.