I love Redefining Realness selfies. This one was taken after my Pride Week keynote and book signing at Virginia Tech. Thanks to the organizers, especially LGBTA and QPOC, for hosting me!

I love Redefining Realness selfies. This one was taken after my Pride Week keynote and book signing at Virginia Tech. Thanks to the organizers, especially LGBTA and QPOC, for hosting me!

Sat down with Marc Lamont Hill at HuffPost Live today to discuss The Out List, which airs tonight 6/27 at 930pm EST, and why our movement needs to expand its lens.

Got to hangout with Melissa Harris-Perry + Joy Reid today (online, at least) for an MSNBC & G+ conversation about marriage and other #SCOTUS fails and victories.  We were joined by the Proposition 8 plaintiffs Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrillo.

HBO The Out List: Being the Only Trans Woman Interviewed | Janet Mock

My reflections on filming and watching The Out List (which airs tomorrow night on HBO) in the wake of DOMA, GENDA, VRA and many more battles won and lost.

On SCOTUS & DOMA & VRA

I posted this on FB and thought I’d share publicly:

The burden of living in a “time on two crosses” (Bayard Rustin)…Some of us are dealing with bittersweet complexities today as trans and queer people of color, whom applaud the monumental victory of DOMA being struck down yet go home to communities of color who must continue to deal with the blatant racism of our voting process, upheld by the SCOTUS ruling against the Voting Rights Act.

In struggle + solidarity, always,

Janet

Janet Mock Joins Arcus Foundation Board of Directors

I am thrilled to announce that I have joined the Board of Directors of the Arcus Foundation. I look forward to continuing this movement building work for people of all colors, bodies, gender identities and sexual orientations.

I recently picked up some in-flight reading material, which included Jet magazine’s latest issue (April 29, 2013) - a special report on the invisibility of missing black children. 
While reading, I was stunned to see that the news section of the magazine not only covered trans folks and restroom use, but also a story from a 29-year-old trans woman of color named Brandi Ahzionae.
In the one-page profile (on page 15), Brandy opens up about her journey towards womanhood, about having to leave home due to a lack of acceptance of her gender, about “turn[ing] to the streets,” about using drugs and partying as a means to cope and about daring to survive this hostile world by engaging in the sex trade. 
"My life shifted when I met a group of fellow tarns sisters who provided love I’d never felt before," Brandi says. "They made me feel comfortable about fully transitioning."
Never underestimate the transformative power of sisterhood. We need more spaces dedicated to collective growth, learning and pro-sisterhood intent.
To have this story featured in a legendary black publication, one read by many black households, is a feat. When our stories are told not only in “mainstream press” (which is way far behind) and by the “LGbt mainstream” (which is also failing us and trans and queer folk of color miserably), but in the publications read by communities of color, true acceptance and growth occurs.
We hear often about the violent exiling of trans women of color, we hear about our vulnerability when it comes to HIV/AIDS, homelessness, sex work and sex trade, lack of employment, housing, shelter and education. But what we do not hear often is the stories and the voices of black trans women like Brandi, like Kiara St. James and Tanya Walker and numerous other sisters of color. My voice, Laverne Cox's voice, Isis King's voice is not enough.
I applaud you, my dear sister Brandi, for daring to be seen, for sharing your story with all of us, for carrying the torch and legacy of active resistance and survival that trans women of color have long uplifted. I also applaud the editors of Jet for recognizing Brandi’s resilience and brilliance - and embracing trans women as your sisters and daughters too.
Now we must call on the rest of our communities to do this embracing work and ignite change for all of our sisters.

I recently picked up some in-flight reading material, which included Jet magazine’s latest issue (April 29, 2013) - a special report on the invisibility of missing black children

While reading, I was stunned to see that the news section of the magazine not only covered trans folks and restroom use, but also a story from a 29-year-old trans woman of color named Brandi Ahzionae.

In the one-page profile (on page 15), Brandy opens up about her journey towards womanhood, about having to leave home due to a lack of acceptance of her gender, about “turn[ing] to the streets,” about using drugs and partying as a means to cope and about daring to survive this hostile world by engaging in the sex trade. 

"My life shifted when I met a group of fellow tarns sisters who provided love I’d never felt before," Brandi says. "They made me feel comfortable about fully transitioning."

Never underestimate the transformative power of sisterhood. We need more spaces dedicated to collective growth, learning and pro-sisterhood intent.

To have this story featured in a legendary black publication, one read by many black households, is a feat. When our stories are told not only in “mainstream press” (which is way far behind) and by the “LGbt mainstream” (which is also failing us and trans and queer folk of color miserably), but in the publications read by communities of color, true acceptance and growth occurs.

We hear often about the violent exiling of trans women of color, we hear about our vulnerability when it comes to HIV/AIDS, homelessness, sex work and sex trade, lack of employment, housing, shelter and education. But what we do not hear often is the stories and the voices of black trans women like Brandi, like Kiara St. James and Tanya Walker and numerous other sisters of color. My voice, Laverne Cox's voice, Isis King's voice is not enough.

I applaud you, my dear sister Brandi, for daring to be seen, for sharing your story with all of us, for carrying the torch and legacy of active resistance and survival that trans women of color have long uplifted. I also applaud the editors of Jet for recognizing Brandi’s resilience and brilliance - and embracing trans women as your sisters and daughters too.

Now we must call on the rest of our communities to do this embracing work and ignite change for all of our sisters.

Some claim they don’t know any LGBT people of color thriving; others argue that we simply don’t exist. The ‘Many Faces. One Dream.’ Tour shatters those assumptions and challenges that invisibility. As a trans woman of color, I’m all too familiar with the fact that my people have been activating at the intersections of many oppressions for far too long, and my goal as a National Ambassador is to unveil the unseen, overlooked, untapped talent that exists in my community.

If you missed yesterday’s It Gets Better Google+ Hangout, here’s the trans* discussion I moderated with Andy Marra, Tiq Milan and Noah Ryan. Minor tech hiccups at the start, but I promise it’s fun, fast & informative!

All hangouts can be viewed at http://itgetsbetter.org/hangout.

I am living for this: “Yall better quiet down!”

thespiritwas:

Sylvia Rivera kicking ass on stage after some radfems & transphobes tried to refuse her the right to speak at the 1973 Christopher Street Liberation Day rally.  Said radfems then had their own march in part protesting trans participation in Pride.  A precursor to today’s Dyke March.  

40 years later in the very same park trans women are still fighting for space within Pride as this year’s Dyke March fiasco demonstrated.  I’m feeling challenged and troubled by the narrative that trans women’s response to transphobia must take the “form of serious, calm, point by point analyses of why radfems are wrong” as Stephen Ira pointed out.

What strikes me about this video is that she isn’t trying to be calm and collected after being attacked.  She’s not internalizing the notion that fighting transphobia has to take on the oppressive notion of “respectability.”

These conversations have left me wondering: has the non profit industrial complex and professionalized activism gentrified our political activity?

So within all of that, I say: nothing but love and power to trans women creating space for ourselves in queer community! Special shout out to Voz who inspired this post!