womanistgrrrlcollective:

[x]
Date: June 7, 2014Start Time: 09:00 amEnd Time: 5:00 pmLocation: Barnard Hall at Barnard CollegeAddress: W 117th St & BroadwayWhere: New York CityRSVP: Click Here
Are you feminist media maker or activist? Love creating, consuming, and critiquing media that deals with race, gender, and class? Want to get more tools, strategies, and ideas to do your work better and meet others doing awesome work? Join us for the fifth annual WAM!NYC Feminist Media Conference on June 7 at Barnard College! Click here to register now!
This year’s keynote event will be a Q&A will be the incredible Janet Mock, transgender rights activist and author of Redefining Realness, moderated by Zerlina Maxwell, political analyst and writer.
Panels this year will include discussions and workshops on: effective social media, long-form journalism, book publishing, art and activism, and navigating the editor/writer relationship, among others!
This year’s conference will be bigger than ever before, but still, seats are limited. We expect this event to sell out quickly. We want everyone in the WAM!NYC community to be able to secure a seat, so we strongly encourage you to buy your ticket now! 
Please email wamnyc-board@googlegroups.com if you would like to volunteer or for a reduced price.
Thank you to our co-sponsor Barnard College!

Excited to be apart of this powerful day!

womanistgrrrlcollective:

[x]
Date: June 7, 2014
Start Time: 09:00 am
End Time: 5:00 pm
Location: Barnard Hall at Barnard College
Address: W 117th St & Broadway
Where: New York City
RSVP: Click Here

Are you feminist media maker or activist? Love creating, consuming, and critiquing media that deals with race, gender, and class? Want to get more tools, strategies, and ideas to do your work better and meet others doing awesome work? Join us for the fifth annual WAM!NYC Feminist Media Conference on June 7 at Barnard College! Click here to register now!

This year’s keynote event will be a Q&A will be the incredible Janet Mock, transgender rights activist and author of Redefining Realness, moderated by Zerlina Maxwell, political analyst and writer.

Panels this year will include discussions and workshops on: effective social media, long-form journalism, book publishing, art and activism, and navigating the editor/writer relationship, among others!

This year’s conference will be bigger than ever before, but still, seats are limited. We expect this event to sell out quickly. We want everyone in the WAM!NYC community to be able to secure a seat, so we strongly encourage you to buy your ticket now! 

Please email wamnyc-board@googlegroups.com if you would like to volunteer or for a reduced price.

Thank you to our co-sponsor Barnard College!

Excited to be apart of this powerful day!

Legally Recognize Non-Binary Genders | We the People: Your Voice in Our Government

no-fear-no-envy-no-meanness:

SIGN THIS THERE IS ONE DAY LEFT

We all deserve recognition to express our fullest selves. 

tuttlecommunications:

Trans people are exactly who they say they are.  No matter what the culture or media would lead us to believe. ~ @JanetMock

Self-definition and self-determination for all.

tuttlecommunications:

Trans people are exactly who they say they are. No matter what the culture or media would lead us to believe. ~ @JanetMock

Self-definition and self-determination for all.

LaurLy: The Curious Conundrum of the Code-Switching Tokenized Teacher

laur-ly:

Note: I’m changing it up a little bit, and writing about some non-sciencey stuff: race and tokenism in America. I was inspired by a marvelous piece I read recently about astrophysicist Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson. It made me think about my own experiences as a minority in science and engineering,…

Really enjoyed this piece. It resonated deeply with me as a person carrying multiplicities when I enter many spaces where no one like me has entered before.

Who We Say Matters: A Message for CeCe, Trayvon, Paige & #GirlsLikeUs

CeCe McDonald and other resistant trans women of color hold me accountable daily in my work. In 2012, I wrote about Cece and Trayvon Martin, making a link between their cases and the media’s (lack of) response. Both broke my heart, made me stand up, raise my political consciousness and sharpen my intersectional lens.

 

Help kickass trans activist and singer KOKUMO fund her second annual T.G.I.F. (Trans*, Gender Non-Conforming, Intersex Freedom) Pride Rally in Chicago.  It’s rare for our movement to support spaces created by trans women of color. Let’s make a change.

Contribute funds here or reach out to T.G.I.F. organizers in Chicago (kokumomedia[AT]gmail[DOT]com) for opportunities to help with organizing or assisting with the 2013 rally.

Read this Village Voice cover story this morning and got my life + became a fan. Specifically here:
"Quattlebaum says he hates … the field of queer studies along with it. ‘I have a lot of problems with the academic queer community because it’s a community that exists completely removed from reality,’ he says. ‘Those kids who are selling their bodies on the West Side Highway, on Christopher Street, they don’t even know what the fuck queer theory is.’”
Hence our need to be rooted in grassroots, in the streets, in solidarity with those who are “marginalized.” I’m done with folks and organizations speaking our names and bodies in theory, in death, in stats. Yet ignoring the same folks they discuss in theory without ever knowing us, without ever trying to engage, without ever “outreaching,” without ever lending the stage and resources to us. 
As a trans woman of color - no matter what space I enter - I have one stilletoed foot on the street. Always.

Read this Village Voice cover story this morning and got my life + became a fan. Specifically here:

"Quattlebaum says he hates … the field of queer studies along with it. ‘I have a lot of problems with the academic queer community because it’s a community that exists completely removed from reality,’ he says. ‘Those kids who are selling their bodies on the West Side Highway, on Christopher Street, they don’t even know what the fuck queer theory is.’”

Hence our need to be rooted in grassroots, in the streets, in solidarity with those who are “marginalized.” I’m done with folks and organizations speaking our names and bodies in theory, in death, in stats. Yet ignoring the same folks they discuss in theory without ever knowing us, without ever trying to engage, without ever “outreaching,” without ever lending the stage and resources to us. 

As a trans woman of color - no matter what space I enter - I have one stilletoed foot on the street. Always.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Today, I returned to the Melissa Harris Perry Show, where (guess what???) I got to discuss…TV + Scandal + media representations of black women. I got the chance to speak about something other than just being trans in mainstream media. 

It’s an exhibition in the fact that trans people do have other interests than just being trans or having “transitioned.” It was a pleasure to return to my giddy pop culture editor roots (with a touch of depth, right?!) and do it on such a powerful platform with one of my sheroes, Melissa Harris Perry.

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Yesterday I made my debut on the Melissa Harris-Perry Show on MSNBC - the only political show that I watch. During the segment, I discussed redefining equality, unpacking the monolith of our community, GLAAD’s name change and why we’ll need more from our internal and external allies:

"What I need from these people [our LGBT & Straight Allies] is to fight for access to healthcare coverage, for protection when I’m looking to use the restroom, when I’m looking for housing, employment, and education. Also legal and social recognition that trans women are women and trans men are men, and that some trans people choose not to identify with either and self-determination is okay." -Me, Janet Mock ;-)

On this International Women’s Day, I celebrate the trans women living, interacting, activating, speaking, writing, acting, singing, organizing, breathing, smiling, crying, working, werqing, twerking, serving, reading, loving, and giving at the margins of this oftentimes hostile, misogynistic, classist, racist, femmephobic, gender-policing world. 

I’m in awe of Monica Roberts, Valerie Spencer, Laverne Cox, Danielle King, Ayana Elliott, and Rev. Camarion Anderson, six black trans women who shared space at the National Black Justice Coalition's historic trans women townhall, where they told their stories, shared their wisdom and educated the community about what it means to be fighting on behalf of trans women, specifically those of color, everywhere.

I can’t wait until the day when we are able, as a community, to truly celebrate the diverse portrait of womanhood - all girls and women from all walks of life - so that townhalls like these are not historic, but the norm for trans women.