I got to interview one of the women who helped shape my image of self as a young woman via her work on “Girlfriends.” Now, she’s back on TV with ABC’s “Black-ish,” and she joined me as I filled in for Larry King on his new talk series. We discussed feminism, race and gender on TV, Diana Ross, hair and so much more. 

Watch us go in on Hulu or Ora.TV

Janet Mock on Beyoncé’s feminism.

We can be sexual, sexy and flawless while advocating and fighting and educating and uplifting and critiquing and challenging and giving and everything.

Video: Janet Mock on Beyonce's Feminism: 'Gender Equality and Sexuality Don't Have to Be Mutually Exclusive'

I joined Alicia Menendez to discuss Beyonce, feminism, her sexuality and body and image in time for the launch of her “On the Run” tour.

And what’s the only thing, I think, Beyonce shouldn’t do on her new concert? (hint: It involved “Drunk In Love”)

Janet Mock is not playing the game of respectability politics. She could, if she wanted, be a kind of trans woman Bill Cosby, at pains to make an example of her normalcy, eager to give an image makeover to trans people at large. “I have been held up consistently as a token,” she says in her new memoir Redefining Realness, “as the ‘right’ kind of trans woman (educated, able-bodied, attractive, articulate, heteronormative).” But having grown up low-income, multiracial, and trans, Mock knows too much about being the wrong kind of woman to glory in exceptionalism. Since the 2011 profile in Marie Claire in which she announced herself as a trans woman, she’s started the #GirlsLikeUs Twitter campaign and become a spokesperson and activist for trans issues. The profile more or less maintained the rhetoric of respectability, leading with her “supportive man” and “enviable career” as editor of People.com. But now Mock is telling her own story, and she does not omit the dark, the delicate, and the potentially disreputable.
Went in with bell hooks about black womanhood, gender policing, trans women of color, desire, self-love and so much more during our intimate conversation at Ohio State University. It was organized by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Multicultural Center and titled, "Gender Policing & the Politics of Defining Womanhood."
Last night, upon our first meeting, I gave bell my book Redefining Realness, and she surprised me at breakfast this AM by having read the entire book. She actually read passages to the audience! It was a transformative experience for both of us, as black women from different generations and experiences to share stories, insights and thoughts. 

Went in with bell hooks about black womanhood, gender policing, trans women of color, desire, self-love and so much more during our intimate conversation at Ohio State University. It was organized by the Office of Diversity and Inclusion and the Multicultural Center and titled, "Gender Policing & the Politics of Defining Womanhood."

Last night, upon our first meeting, I gave bell my book Redefining Realness, and she surprised me at breakfast this AM by having read the entire book. She actually read passages to the audience! It was a transformative experience for both of us, as black women from different generations and experiences to share stories, insights and thoughts. 

"You’ll never be thin enough, blonde enough, black enough."
-Joy Bryant

"You’ll never be thin enough, blonde enough, black enough."

-Joy Bryant

(Source: fuckyeahfamousblackgirls)

sonofbaldwin:

“In many parts of the world, people are judged not just by their skin color but also by their skin tone. The devaluing of dark-skinned women, which is discussed in the documentary, Dark Girls, is something many African-American actresses must overcome. Watch as Alfre Woodard, Viola Davis, Phylicia Rashad and Gabrielle Union tackle the light versus dark-skinned debate.

Watch this episode of Oprah’s Next Chapter on Sunday, June 23, at 9/8c, plus the world television premiere of the documentary Dark Girls at 10/9c.

For more on Oprah’s Next Chapter visit http://www.oprah.com/OprahsNextChapter

Find OWN on TV at http://www.oprah.com/FindOWN

Cannot wait for this.

theblacksophisticate:

thatactor:

Why does Phylicia Rashad always look like she knows something that you don’t?

Because she usually DOES.

TRUTH! #sheroes

theblacksophisticate:

thatactor:

Why does Phylicia Rashad always look like she knows something that you don’t?

Because she usually DOES.

TRUTH! #sheroes

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Today, I returned to the Melissa Harris Perry Show, where (guess what???) I got to discuss…TV + Scandal + media representations of black women. I got the chance to speak about something other than just being trans in mainstream media. 

It’s an exhibition in the fact that trans people do have other interests than just being trans or having “transitioned.” It was a pleasure to return to my giddy pop culture editor roots (with a touch of depth, right?!) and do it on such a powerful platform with one of my sheroes, Melissa Harris Perry.

On this International Women’s Day, I celebrate the trans women living, interacting, activating, speaking, writing, acting, singing, organizing, breathing, smiling, crying, working, werqing, twerking, serving, reading, loving, and giving at the margins of this oftentimes hostile, misogynistic, classist, racist, femmephobic, gender-policing world. 

I’m in awe of Monica Roberts, Valerie Spencer, Laverne Cox, Danielle King, Ayana Elliott, and Rev. Camarion Anderson, six black trans women who shared space at the National Black Justice Coalition's historic trans women townhall, where they told their stories, shared their wisdom and educated the community about what it means to be fighting on behalf of trans women, specifically those of color, everywhere.

I can’t wait until the day when we are able, as a community, to truly celebrate the diverse portrait of womanhood - all girls and women from all walks of life - so that townhalls like these are not historic, but the norm for trans women.