gradientlair:

"Janet, you know how much I love you. I look up to you as a big sister. And this book really, in my eyes, made me see myself as not just the one who went through my experience alone. Every time I would read a page in your book, it would be like a black and white scene of a movie in my head of my life, of something that you experienced that I’ve experienced in some way. It’s really hard for me to express myself to people when it comes to experiences that I had whether it be good or bad. And for you to have written a book about that is really a blessing. It’s like…this is like the ten commandments for us right now. Like literally. It speaks truth. And with truth comes freedom." - CeCe McDonald
Part of what Cece McDonald said to Janet Mock in regards to her important, exquisitely written, groundbreaking book about being a trans woman of colour, Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More. Quote is from The Barnard Center For Research on Women annual salon that featured several panelists.

Oh, CeCe. I love that girl.

gradientlair:

"Janet, you know how much I love you. I look up to you as a big sister. And this book really, in my eyes, made me see myself as not just the one who went through my experience alone. Every time I would read a page in your book, it would be like a black and white scene of a movie in my head of my life, of something that you experienced that I’ve experienced in some way. It’s really hard for me to express myself to people when it comes to experiences that I had whether it be good or bad. And for you to have written a book about that is really a blessing. It’s like…this is like the ten commandments for us right now. Like literally. It speaks truth. And with truth comes freedom." - CeCe McDonald

Part of what Cece McDonald said to Janet Mock in regards to her important, exquisitely written, groundbreaking book about being a trans woman of colour, Redefining Realness: My Path to Womanhood, Identity, Love & So Much More. Quote is from The Barnard Center For Research on Women annual salon that featured several panelists.

Oh, CeCe. I love that girl.

yasminabdulqadir:

meeting ms. mock (!)
can you spot my east african forehead? (haaay)

I love all the foreheads in this photo.

yasminabdulqadir:

meeting ms. mock (!)

can you spot my east african forehead? (haaay)

I love all the foreheads in this photo.

thespiritwas:

Barnard Center for Research On Women recently posted the video of the Janet Mock Salon last April.  I had such a great time moderating this panel/roast/celebration/salon in honor of Janet Mock’s book. Check out the unmeasurable brilliance of my sibling Che Gossett, CeCe McDonald, Brittany Cooper, Mey Valdivia Rude and of course the one & only Janet Mock!

Hands down! One of the greatest nights of my life to have my work be embraced by these brilliant thinkers. 

I got to interview one of the women who helped shape my image of self as a young woman via her work on “Girlfriends.” Now, she’s back on TV with ABC’s “Black-ish,” and she joined me as I filled in for Larry King on his new talk series. We discussed feminism, race and gender on TV, Diana Ross, hair and so much more. 

Watch us go in on Hulu or Ora.TV

A sneak peek at my interview with the one and only Tracee Ellis Ross, whom I grilled about her first kiss, celeb crush and more (feminism, style, her mother Diana Ross, her new show Black-ish on ABC, and the legacy of GIRLFRIENDS!) during our wide-ranging convo when I filled in for Larry King on his new talk series, Larry King Now. 

Our full convo will premiere tonight on Hulu + Ora.TV!

housingworksbookstore:

 Event Announcment: Tavi Gevinson, Editor-in-chief of Rookie, in Conversation with Janet Mock 

Join us to celebrate the release of Rookie Yearbook Three, a compendium of the best of the online magazine’s third year, including interviews, artwork, and new contributions from some of Rookie’s favorite people. Tavi Gevinson, rookiemag’s editor-in-chief, and Janet Mock, author and advocate, will field and discuss questions from Rookie readers. General admission tickets only $8! More info.

So looking forward to teaming up with Tavi to celebrate the release of Rookie Yearbook Three, which my interview is featured in. 

housingworksbookstore:

Event Announcment: Tavi Gevinson, Editor-in-chief of Rookie, in Conversation with Janet Mock

Join us to celebrate the release of Rookie Yearbook Three, a compendium of the best of the online magazine’s third year, including interviews, artwork, and new contributions from some of Rookie’s favorite people. Tavi Gevinson, rookiemag’s editor-in-chief, and Janet Mock, author and advocate, will field and discuss questions from Rookie readers. General admission tickets only $8! More info.

So looking forward to teaming up with Tavi to celebrate the release of Rookie Yearbook Three, which my interview is featured in. 

glossophiliqueer-for-now:

#janetmock #dammitjanet #rockyhorror #rhps #transgenderproblems #TransPride #girlslikeus

I love the interwebs and all the amazing people on it.

Frankly, the mischaracterization of the glorious Mrs. Huxtable as “benign” and “reassuring” turned me into an angry black woman. One of Clair’s most admirable qualities — something I took notice as a child growing up in the early ’90s — was that she never bit her tongue. Her ability to express her frustration with the world and slay anyone in an argument, including her husband, her children and any person who disagreed with her views of the world, was aspirational. And seeing this vocal and sharp portrayal of a black woman and TV mother on primetime was revolutionary.
—from my latest essay, In Defense of Clair Huxtable & the Angry Black Woman In TV & Beyond

Frankly, the mischaracterization of the glorious Mrs. Huxtable as “benign” and “reassuring” turned me into an angry black woman. One of Clair’s most admirable qualities — something I took notice as a child growing up in the early ’90s — was that she never bit her tongue. Her ability to express her frustration with the world and slay anyone in an argument, including her husband, her children and any person who disagreed with her views of the world, was aspirational. And seeing this vocal and sharp portrayal of a black woman and TV mother on primetime was revolutionary.

—from my latest essay, In Defense of Clair Huxtable & the Angry Black Woman In TV & Beyond

So I put my arms down and wrapped them around me. I began healing by embracing myself through the foreboding darkness until the sunrise shone on my face.
ethiopienne:

Janet Mock looking celestial.

Excuse my vanity.

ethiopienne:

Janet Mock looking celestial.

Excuse my vanity.