thoughtsofalexx:

So excited to read this!

LOVE IT! <3

thoughtsofalexx:

So excited to read this!

LOVE IT! <3

The other night, I found myself queening out to this song by Zeke Thomas, off of my dear friend Ed Jamele’s label Gorilla Records.

Bye, Felicia! Get it here

Heroes — a Collaboration with artist Julio Salgado

I was honored when undocuqueer artivist Julio Salgado emailed me about wanting to collaborate on a project about my biggest influences. He drew portraits of me embracing my heroes, and I provided words about their significance in my life. 

These images moved me to tears, and I am grateful to Julio for creating them with me. 

AUDRE LORDE

Audre Lorde was the first black lesbian feminist writer I was exposed to in college, and she blew my world up. Her body of work, from her poetry to her prose, pushed me to transform silence and define myself.

MAYA ANGELOU

I first read “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings” in the 10th grade, and Maya Angelou pushed me to make freedom my lifelong quest. She wrote about being a black girl who was touched without permission and protection, and it emboldened me to share my most uncomfortable truths.

SYLVIA RIVERA

Our elders are our greatest untapped resource, and Sylvia is my blueprint. Without the work and legacies of my foremothers (including Marsha P. Johnson and Miss Major Griffin-Gracy!) I could not and would not be able to thrive as a young trans woman writer of color.

ZORA NEALE HURSTON

Without Zora Neale Hurston’s “Their Eyes Were Watching God” there would be no “Redefining Realness.” Zora was a revolutionary woman and writer. She centered a black woman’s quest for identity and love, making Janie Crawford my No. 1 heroine. This book is a lifemap!

JAMES BALDWIN

I adore no man more than James Baldwin. I’ve devoured all his writings and find myself seeking his guidance by watching footage of his interviews. There is no better orator and thinker than Baldwin. He slays, all day, every day.

I&#8217;m the winner! 

I’m the winner! 

queergiftedblack:

#Selfies, Shame & Self-Love

Yaaas to this!

Dascha Polanco attends the Rolando Santana Fashion Show at NYFW

Serve.

(Source: orangeis)

lastnightsreading:

Janet Mock at Buzzfeed LIVE, 9/4/14

So cool! Thanks Kate Gavino for this sketch of me from last night&#8217;s reading hosted by BuzzFeed + The Toast!
 

lastnightsreading:

Janet Mock at Buzzfeed LIVE, 9/4/14

So cool! Thanks Kate Gavino for this sketch of me from last night’s reading hosted by BuzzFeed + The Toast!

 

Happy BeyDay to my favorite pop cultural figure! She&#8217;s 33 and I can&#8217;t believe I&#8217;ve been riding with her for more than 16 years. It&#8217;s been quite the journey watching her g from DC to bawse to mama to leotard-slaying budding feminist cultural icon. 
This one&#8217;s for you. 

Happy BeyDay to my favorite pop cultural figure! She’s 33 and I can’t believe I’ve been riding with her for more than 16 years. It’s been quite the journey watching her g from DC to bawse to mama to leotard-slaying budding feminist cultural icon. 

This one’s for you

endofsomerland:

"[sex workers] came to merchant street and took control of their bodies—bodies that were radical in their mere existence in this misogynistic, transphobic, elitist world[…]The varied, often conflicting portraits these women presented shaped my developing composition of womanhood. When I am asked how I define womanhood, I often quote feminist author Simone de Beauvoir: "one is not born, but rather becomes a woman."[…]This short, powerful statement assured me that I have the freedom, in spite of and because of my birth, body, race, gender expectations, and economic resources, to define myself for myself and for others." -Janet Mock (Redefining Realness)

Love when readers share their quotes that resonate with them with me. Thanks for reading Redefining Realness.

My new essay explores how Beyonce&#8217;s feminist stance in pop culture helped frame my own feminist awakening:
"I am in my 30s and was emboldened by Beyonce’s feminist stance on that stage, and can’t help but believe that that image will be equally as powerful to young people who witness that moment, whose first engagement with feminism will be that moment. Maybe, just maybe, Beyonce will serve as the bridgebetween pop culture and feminists like bell and Barbara and Audre, maybe some young woman bobbing her head to &#8216;Blow&#8217; or &#8216;Partition&#8217; or &#8216;Flawless&#8217; will do so while reading Ain’t I A Woman? or Homegirls or Sister Outsider.&#8221;
&#8212;FROM my new essay: My Feminist Awakening &amp; the Influence of Beyonce&#8217;s Pop Culture Declaration

My new essay explores how Beyonce’s feminist stance in pop culture helped frame my own feminist awakening:

"I am in my 30s and was emboldened by Beyonce’s feminist stance on that stage, and can’t help but believe that that image will be equally as powerful to young people who witness that moment, whose first engagement with feminism will be that moment. Maybe, just maybe, Beyonce will serve as the bridgebetween pop culture and feminists like bell and Barbara and Audre, maybe some young woman bobbing her head to ‘Blow’ or ‘Partition’ or ‘Flawless’ will do so while reading Ain’t I A Woman? or Homegirls or Sister Outsider.”

—FROM my new essay: My Feminist Awakening & the Influence of Beyonce’s Pop Culture Declaration